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Rating History

Jackie Brown
Jackie Brown (1997)
6 months ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

Jackson is hyper about it and De Niro is taking it slow. this choreography is more focused on stunts than authentic dance.

Jackie Brown

Tarantino is conning us. Literally. With a sublime texture scraped off from these characters, his display of the boneless flesh is too flamboyant to break or shock you. The co-writer and director, Quentin Tarantino's fourth film is adapted from the novel Rum Punch written by Elmore Leonard. And this adaptation unfortunately didn't go well for Tarantino. Busy in his own state of mind and comic timing, Tarantino is either leaping over stuff or overstretching stuff. This results in a bizarre pace for the film, something that takes us plenty of time to fit in into.

And clocking at more than two and a half hours, the flips and turns that Tarantino so effortlessly whispers in the script could barely be reliable enough to fiddle us with these many hokum events. And yes, it does work when it comes to pump our heart fast and scare us through one-liners by Samuel L. Jackson who states it without blinking his eyes. But that could have easily been carried off, without individually introducing these characters in the narration.

By the way, no one hypes up the name of the character like Tarantino, before they even arrive or impress us, the flown rumors are so bedazzling that you ought to cheer up when they finally enter the screen. Jackson has got the coolness of the all the plot points, with a gold membership card, he has access to every track of the film and yet, it feels like he never fully squeezes it out from the script. In fact, any of the cast member, they never come alive on screen, with such a caliber of cast, from Robert De Niro to Michael Keaton, you'd think you would be moved by them colliding on the screen and instead you have to rely upon Jackie Brown who will and does cheat you; she is told to.

Gloria Bell
Gloria Bell (2019)
6 months ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

The bell has been rung, protect your showcased possessions, this glass tower won't be able to survive the sharpness of it.

Gloria Bell

Lelio is not remaking but recooking the ingredients. And fortunately, it is as delicious as it was in the first place. Usually people consider the momentum of the previously ridden project- especially remaking it- and end up being vague and superstitious about their content, but not him, not Sebastian Lelio, the director. He is a gentleman, not when he is crafting the tiny aspects- the small talks Julianne Moore makes up in social visits or drive through songs she sings so religiously or how she dutifully attempts to mend the broken patches- of the struggle, women go through but when he puts the men in trial.

Fair is their lexicon and familiar is their behavior. Is he extracting this from somewhere, of course, this definitely seems like a work from a good observer; just as good a storyteller he is. Another notable and impressive armory of his, is how confident and serene he is while making multiple characters confront each other and expect us to be moved by the intensity of it. And it does. With such a stupendous dinner conversation among a family, the pivotal point of the film, lives up to the responsibility of it.

By now, Moore is just taking it easy. A career so spectacular and of such a wide range, she has pulled off a trigger like such before too, but not to this extent. She is punching hard frivolously for a more jarring impact and it works, we, as an audience, gets buzzed for it wolfishly. Lelio's world is a place where you would wish to reside in, it is hopeful and pragmatic, you get a chance to walk out of things and come back right into it, it is a free world just like ours, in fact it is ours, but not Gloria Bell, I don't know her but I would surely love to meet her.

Funny People
Funny People (2009)
6 months ago via Rotten Tomatoes
½

Apatow relies upon little wins, in this successively disappointing chapter about depressed characters, Sandler is his biggest win.

Funny People

Apatow is closing down a comedy club. Ironically, despite of the film title, the director, Judd Apatow has made a film about unfunny people. Sad and lost, drinking their own sorrow, exhaling their fear and failure, this is an incredibly difficult story to pull off. With such poignancy involved- not that it depends upon it, but the route it takes is way too dark and upsetting- the grip could easily be lost with the viewers. Especially, if there is very little to feel empathetic about the characters, something that Apatow may earn in latter stages, but to have that in your pocket from the start would be almost impossible.

Also, he treats his film like a musical. With every step further advanced in the script, there comes a tight five minute of train of jokes plastered as some stand up gig, trying to balance the comedy and drama. Unfortunately, while doing so, what Apatow forgets is that, he is stopping the clock ticking every time he follows the jokes. And as always, a written down joke varies completely different from the one performed, boiling it down to a not-so-tight five minutes.

Seth Rogen is the perfect host, as in he never takes charge on the screen, he is supportive in the perfect way, he allows others to control the energy. And in control is, Adam Sandler in his most darkest role. He is somehow himself, from his intuitions and vocab and body language on the stage, but him destroying himself with various cooky tactics is definitely difficult to swallow. And that sombre part of Sandler is where he excels in the film. Funny Man is not funny and nor is about a common man, ergo the term "normal" gets a whole new definition and the film feeds on it every time, Apatow refreshes it with a new batch.

Barbershop: The Next Cut
6 months ago via Rotten Tomatoes

Cube is getting the bigger cut and he never takes it for granted, just like the world he revolves around, the chemistry is off the hook.

Barbershop: The Next Cut

Lee knows it is the White House party of the parties. Everybody would want to be in it and everyone would want to have a big chunk of that cake. And offering them enough space to come in and present their show as they feel, the director, Malcolm D. Lee is rearranging the shuffled acts into one big discussion. Yes. Discussion is what the film feels like. And to be honest, it is a fair discussion, swooping in every opinion and perspective and idea and even a politically wrong comment. This is how honest, they are, they mock so arrogantly and accepts the insults and repercussions bravely.

In fact, the very first act is it. Ticking for almost the first half, the discussions are the best part of the film, it starts off from fighting over the equality, they find themselves tangled in a long chain, ping pong-ing back and forth, spewing and biting each other trying to prove their superiority sarcastically. The referential comedy is turned to 11. To someone who doesn't come from that background, would get definitely difficult to grab the momentum of the humor.

Another major improvement is scoffing off the limitations that their previous installments had, correcting themselves politically and going toe-to-toe with the generations, the pace has improved and sensitive content juiced up. Ice Cube is still the sober worker in this shop and Cedric still the most drunk one, no new character coming in with their fresh humorous vocab could beat Cedric's comic timing, he has been in their chair for more than a decade ago and that throne is well earned. Barbershop: The Next Cut may feel like the cut that you have been getting over the years, it's just that they have used the wave of the current media into account that will make you feel like you are new, once again.

Barbershop 2: Back in Business
6 months ago via Rotten Tomatoes

Cube and Cedric are going hand in hand winning over each hurdle, they keep the legacy alive, while business comes in handy.

Barbershop 2: Back In Business

Kevin Rodney Sullivan, the director, has equally long film to run through. Jumping in the life of these familiar characters who have managed to exceed well enough in terms of capabilities both personally and professionally and yet as the film ages on screen, they have managed to stay the same. This is how excellent their command over the character is, they flaunt at their best and even at their worst. Not accepting to back down, should have been fabricated as their example of prowess but this is a rough town, and things go down pretty bad, pretty soon.

And yet they never learn, something that never covers the arc completely on their character which by now, I guess is a scheme to keep coming back as an excuse and well, make money; I mean, it is a Ice Cube production. Queen Latifah, the mixture of rivalry and friendly equation with our folks never could own the trash talk she is offered, the overdoing of that every bit of linguistic slices down the earned respect. But fortunately, these additional appearances are for brief moments, what stays with you is who has stayed with us up till now.

It is much more engaging to see an empty room crowded by the range that these revisiting characters needs for nothing but their sassiness. Ice Cube, this time, a bit mature, seeks for guidance to his father-alike figure Cedric who with his own long lost love story, clears all the fuss expressively. This is what I have loved about the series, if it is light footed, it stays by it all the way, even a crisis a big as such could be eradicated through easy mellow methods where the build up matters and not the impact, and that is how they are getting Back In Business.