2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Documentary - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts - Documentary Reviews

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February 8, 2019
I have always been a sucker for documentary films so I love to give this Oscar category for short docs a shout.
Full Review | Original Score: B
March 4, 2018
My pick: 'Heaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405,' a marvelous portrait of artist Mindy Alper, one that challenges us all to know ourselves as well as she seems to, even when it's incredibly painful.
Full Review | Original Score: 4.5/5
March 4, 2018
Five terrific shorts to consider in what's unofficially become Oscar's charity category.
March 3, 2018
The two programs for the longish (29-40 minutes each) Documentary Shorts straddle both lighter and darker fare.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/5
February 23, 2018
"Heroin(e) humanizes the opioid epidemic with its portrait of three women working to break the cycle of drug abuse in Huntington, Virginia.
February 11, 2018
All pretty good and more importantly for the Oscars pretty important ... The best is Heroin(e), one of the most all-around successful and satisfying films of its kind."
February 10, 2018
The documentary portion of the Oscar-nominated shorts explore such topical issues as the opiate epidemic, prison reform, mental illness and police brutality.
Full Review | Original Score: B
February 8, 2018
The Oscar-nominated shorts may have smaller running times, but the themes tackled are often big.
February 8, 2018
All of the Oscar nominees in the documentary short category address pressing social issues in the United States[,] and they do so with great humanity.
February 7, 2018
These are issues that provoke reflection and discussion, but the individuals and their stories stir up empathy and emotion.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
February 7, 2018
In some years, watching the Oscar-nominated documentary shorts is the easiest way to spot the winner. This year there are plausible rationalizations for all five.
February 7, 2018
...in Netflix's "Heroin(e)." Elaine McMillion Sheldon's work is the crispest, cleanest treatment of subject matter among the nominees, one that serves up despair and hope in equal measure.
Full Review | Original Score: B+
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