Richard Brody Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Richard Brody

Richard Brody
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Top of the Heap (1972) A genre-twisting tale that couches psychological and political furies in spectacularly bold imaginative flourishes.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 4, 2020
87% The Truth (La vérité) (2020) ...intermittently extraordinary...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 2, 2020
No Score Yet Tito (2020) This movie, too, is a tour de force-of performance, in Glowicki's astounding display of choreographic expressionism.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 2, 2020
No Score Yet You Are Not I (1981) With a voice-over that details Ethel's overdone logic and a quietly nerve-jangling score by Phil Kline, Driver conjures vast spans of harrowing experience in infinitesimal gestures.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2020
100% The Long Gray Line (1955) John Ford's 1955 bio-pic about the longtime officer Marty Maher is one of his grandest and heartiest films.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2020
88% The Prison in Twelve Landscapes (2016) An empathetic observer and a probing analyst, Story suffuses the film with grief and indignation.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2020
100% The Other Side of the Mirror - Bob Dylan Newport 1963-1965 (2007) Lerner and his crew capture these vital performances in images of rapt attentiveness...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2020
71% The 11th Green (2020) With tight-lipped restraint, Munch giddily tweaks the past seventy-five years of political assumptions and the very concept of life on Earth.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2020
99% Miss Juneteenth (2020) A warmhearted and pain-streaked melodrama that's deeply anchored in observation and experience.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 22, 2020
No Score Yet Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property (2003) A deeply personal and analytical study of history.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 20, 2020
92% Da 5 Bloods (2020) "Da 5 Bloods" runs two hours and thirty-four minutes, but it's not a second too long. On the contrary, it feels compressed, bustling, and frenzied with its intellectual and dramatic energy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2020
No Score Yet The Story of a Three-Day Pass (1968) Although its protagonist is American and much of the film is in English, the movie reflects the stylistic variety and the freewheeling innovation of the French New Wave.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2020
78% Tommaso (2020) This quasi-confessional drama about a frustrated filmmaker, written and directed by Abel Ferrara, plays more like a vain boast.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2020
100% The Killing Floor (1985) A revelatory historical drama that offers a powerful template for social analysis in fiction.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2020
No Score Yet Take This Hammer (1963) In "Take This Hammer," Baldwin creates a deep, passionate cross-sectional analysis of the lives of black Americans during the struggle for civil rights and amid the endurance of Jim Crow.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
No Score Yet And When I Die, I Won't Stay Dead (2015) Woodberry's most prodigious artistic feat, in composing Kaufman's life, is to fill the film with Kaufman's poetry and to give his writing a distinctive and vital cinematic identity.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 8, 2020
88% Shirley (2020) Moss's facial expressions have a virtually musical complexity and offer surprises, with fiery glares and subtly tormented distortions that shift very slowly and infinitesimally but register onscreen with great dramatic power.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2020
69% The High Note (2020) The sincere charm of this romantic comedy triumphs over its plodding pace and narrow purview.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 1, 2020
84% Manufactured Landscapes (2007) Proves even more revealing than the photographs it celebrates.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 1, 2020
No Score Yet Monk In Europe (1968) The Blackwoods' film connects the art and the anguish: in their discerning, passionately engaged view, the pain that Monk channelled into his puckish side comes through clearly.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2020
No Score Yet Monk (1968) The Blackwoods' film connects the art and the anguish: in their discerning, passionately engaged view, the pain that Monk channelled into his puckish side comes through clearly.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2020
No Score Yet Sad Song (Chanson triste) (2019) It's an intricate and painful docu-fiction that's as audacious in its concept as it is troubling in its substance.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2020
No Score Yet Summer in the City (1969) Some of Blackwood's portraiture is solely and deftly visual, including scenes of people at open windows in a handful of buildings, which he films with darting pans and tilts.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2020
97% The Ghost of Peter Sellers (2020) It's a revealing view of an industry of enormous personalities-and the indulgences that feed them.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 26, 2020
96% I'm Going Home (2001) Oliveira, a nonagenarian when he made the film, conveys the hidden rapture of daily life-and the power of images to preserve it.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 26, 2020
90% What's Up, Doc? (1972) In Bogdanovich's analytical twist on the genre, even joyous liberation leaves a huge mess.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 26, 2020
100% Driveways (2019) The three lead actors carry the movie and do the heavy dramatic lifting gracefully; their sheer presence reaches far beyond the confines of the story.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 26, 2020
67% The Liberation of L.B. Jones (1970) The film is sufficiently confrontational, its incidents sufficiently agonizing and infuriating, to reflect back at viewers a frank, bitter, and outraged political diagnosis.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 22, 2020
95% Stroszek (1977) Herzog's vision of his disillusionment and despair rises to a hectic pitch of absurdist tragedy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 18, 2020
72% The World (2005) Jia's tenderness for his characters is infused with a quiet rage: as the wide-screen views freeze them in a confining emptiness, dead zones of action and dialogue suggest a land where imagination itself has been suppressed.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 18, 2020
No Score Yet Privilege (1990) Suggesting that political progress can't emerge from conservative storytelling, Rainer expands consciousness to inspire social change.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 18, 2020
41% Capone (2020) The ghastly contrasts are built into the well-conceived story, but Trank neither trusts it nor rises to the demands of his phantasmagorical ambitions.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 15, 2020
72% The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008) A sumptuous and stirring romantic drama.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 12, 2020
100% Losing Ground (1982) Collins dramatizes crises of gender and race-as well as of intellectual pursuit and artistic ambition-with a decisive and nuanced touch, and her attentiveness to light and color is itself painterly...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 12, 2020
98% Fourteen (2020) The diverging paths and seething conflicts of two lifelong friends, now young Brooklyn professionals, are explored deeply and poignantly in this deceptively calm melodrama, written and directed by Dan Sallitt.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 12, 2020
71% Dear Diary (Caro diario) (1994) This light-toned but thematically substantial autofiction is organized like a sequence of diary entries brought to life with Moretti's wryly confessional voice-overs.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 12, 2020
82% Fallen Angel (1945) Preminger builds suspense along with emotion, tension along with the passions that threaten to deform the drama and wrench it apart at its hinges.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2020
90% Yeelen (Brightness) (1987) A masterwork of metaphysical realism.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
54% Win a Date With Tad Hamilton! (2004) A surprising triumph of unexpected substance over conventional style.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
82% We Live in Public (2009) Disturbing yet fascinating...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
92% Holy Motors (2012) These images and sounds that reveal the mind in matter and the soul in bodies suggest Carax's ultimate definition of the cinema, and it's one of the best and grandest that a movie has ever offered.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 28, 2020
82% Talk to Me (2007) Don Cheadle brings sharp humor and deep passion to his portrayal of the Washington, D.C., disk jockey and talk-show host Petey Greene in this historically vital and acute bio-pic...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2020
72% Phyllis and Harold (2010) The pressure of real-time secrecy gives this documentary the tension of a thriller.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2020
82% Daisy Miller (1974) Bogdanovich's bravura display of directorial style is as insightful as it is thrilling.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2020
93% You Can't Take It With You (1938) Though much of the comedy blends forced gaiety with sentiment, Arthur and Stewart bring shivery intensity and playful intimacy to the young lovers' ardent bond.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2020
82% Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1969) The director guides his actors to performances of live-wire intensity; their agitated instability and febrile uncertainty burst the boundaries of theatrical precision to suggest his own inner conflicts.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2020
No Score Yet Leda (À double tour) (1999) ...a burst of rage against family propriety, a riotous basket of references to other movies, and a virtuosic display of giddily extravagant style.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2020
88% The Bigamist (1953) [A] glossy yet granular melodrama about the stresses and deceptions of marriage, work, and romance.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2020
100% The Clock (1945) This rapturous wartime romance, starring Judy Garland and Robert Walker, is also a rowdy and tender paean to the liberating vitality of New York's public life and its chance encounters.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2020
80% Crime of Passion (1957) This acerbic film noir features Barbara Stanwyck in one of her greatest performances...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2020