Phil Hoad Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Phil Hoad

Phil Hoad
Phil Hoad's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Guardian

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/5 No Score Yet Solid Gold (2019) Bromski manages the curious combination of being both too impatient to push his case and too slow to make us care.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 5, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet Undocument (2019) [An] empathetic but dogged portmanteau...‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2019
3/5 100% A Good Woman Is Hard to Find (2019) The opportunistic genre-welding holds together thanks to vivid performances.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2019
3/5 53% Ladyworld (2019) Kramer ably allows the mood to degenerate from an icy sensuousness to something ritualistic and intoxicated, one scene blurring into another.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2019
3/5 86% What You Gonna Do When the World's on Fire? (2019) In the film, shot with elegiac finality in black and white, Minervini makes subtle communitarian and intergenerational connections between the stories.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet The Sultan and the Saint (2016) This is all the better to carry an interfaith message with obvious resonance post-9/11.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
4/5 93% The Flower (La flor) (2019) You will no doubt bail out at some point - but that's part of the deal. Llinás has done enough to make sure we come back.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2019
3/5 67% The Shock of the Future (Le choc du futur) (2019) Ana's artistic journey is pure boilerplate; the same misunderstood game-changer schtick Hollywood routinely serves up from the likes of Step Up upwards.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
2/5 No Score Yet The Run (2017) Farmer himself is so indomitable - even a bout of stomach flu barely causes him to break stride - that he isn't that compelling a subject.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2019
4/5 82% Memory: The Origins of Alien (2019) [A] solemn and enlivening documentary...‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Aug 30, 2019
3/5 82% Neither Wolf Nor Dog (2019) [An] earnest but sometimes laboured road movie.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Aug 23, 2019
3/5 100% The Cure: Anniversary 1978-2018 Live in Hyde Park (2019) This concert film - directed by longtime Cure collaborator Tim Pope, who also shot The Cure in Orange, much prized back in the day on VHS - settles for being merely adequate.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jul 11, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet Wine Calling (2019) Sauvard's crowdfunded film finally hits on a different DIY spirit down in the vines, even if it has to shake off a morning hangover first.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 27, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet The Messenger (Kurier) (2019) Pasikowski - a crowdpleasing film-maker with a string of domestic hits - relays Poland's darkest hour with enough nuance and peril to stop Kurier from being outright jingoism.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet Ordinary Time (Tempo comum) (2018) Perhaps Nobre, in this quietly profound film, is saying: we're all just unfinished work, muddling through.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 20, 2019
2/5 64% Balloon (2018) Herbig directs every scene with an overcranked mania, accompanied by a blaring Zimmer-esque score that thinks it's part of the buildup to a Navy Seals assault on an Indian Ocean pirate ship.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
2/5 71% The Etruscan Smile (Rory's Way) (2019) Capable performers throng these otherwise nondescript digital frames, vainly trying to persuade us we're not watching some rogue telefilm.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 30, 2019
4/5 89% Freedom Fields (2018) [A] superbly made, stirring documentary...‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 30, 2019
3/5 91% In Safe Hands (Pupille) (2018) A welcome look at a vital and underappreciated duty of state.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 29, 2019
3/5 98% Too Late to Die Young (Tarde para morir joven) (2019) Castillo's talent for spiritually attuned atmospherics could be her USP among Chile's current crop of directors with idiosyncratic slants on their country's recent past.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 23, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet The Inquiring Nuns (1968) Full of idealism and an innocent faith in the possibilities of people, Inquiring Nuns is a soothing balm for our age of 24/7 online hate.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 22, 2019
3/5 94% My Days of Mercy (2017) The effervescent chemistry between the two leads [saves] it from Sundance-y overearnestness.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 15, 2019
3/5 97% Pick of the Litter (2018) The dogs' personalities, highlighted by a handy name-tag graphic every time each one gets a segment, bound and yap off the screen.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 15, 2019
2/5 No Score Yet Beyond the River (2017) Unlike the protagonists, the film refuses to dig deep and never achieves a thematic head of steam.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Apr 26, 2019
4/5 95% The World Is Yours (Le monde ou rien) (2018) A brash and jubilant Guy Ritchie-style crime caper.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Apr 25, 2019
4/5 96% An Elephant Sitting Still (Da xiang xi di er zuo) (2019) An epitaph for an extremely promising career cut short.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2018
3/5 92% Bumblebee (2018) In a better, truer cinematic universe, Travis Knight would have been in charge of the Transformers franchise all along.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 9, 2018
4/5 100% Dead Souls (2018) Wang's film is a vital excavation of history in danger of being eroded away.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2018
3/5 No Score Yet Paper Tigers (2015) Eye-opening for the layman, vital for anyone pedagogic.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 9, 2018
4/5 91% Mirai (2018) Mirai definitely puts Hosoda in the Japanese industry's top league, showing a similar spirit of high-blown romanticism as Your Name (2016), anime's high-water mark in recent years.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2018
4/5 86% They Live (1988) The film was was responding to the start of the US rust belt and Reagan-era consumerism, but its themes of working-class subjugation and omnipresent media control have only become more pressing.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2018
4/5 58% Prince of Darkness (1987) Close to a decade's experience in horror pays off, with Carpenter working the audience with jump-scares and revolting demises like an old pro.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2018
4/5 85% Escape from New York (1981) The film plays its social satire broad but strings it along a rail of self-awareness.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2018
3/5 76% The Fog (1980) It's one of the director's most atmospheric, the shots of a wave-lashed cove and fog-choked headland making the town's impending reckoning almost poetic.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2018
3/5 83% Beirut (2018) Despite possessing unusually detailed context for a thriller, it's a bit like diplomatic efforts in the region: the same old story.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2018
3/5 60% Detective Dee: The Four Heavenly Kings (Di Renjie zhi Sidatianwang) (2018) The energy is undeniable, especially when delivered via giant Taoist albino gorilla, and the creaky effects have an endearing artisanal quality that feels like a Zu Warriors throwback.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jul 25, 2018
4/5 No Score Yet One or Two Questions (Unas Preguntas) (2018) This surprisingly gripping patchwork of regular Joes expressing their intentions and apprehensions to director Kristina Konrad, then working for Swiss television, couldn't have greater relevance.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
3/5 71% The Opera House (2018) Froemke never fully squares these stories with opera's long-accused elitism. Instead, the film reverts to quietly absorbing inside-baseball territory lit up by a couple of uncommon personalities.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2018
3/5 No Score Yet 7 Days (7 Giorni) (2016) Seven Days loses a little of its focus as it approaches the finish line, but hovering desolation stops it from surrendering to Condé Nast smugness.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Sep 15, 2017
3/5 100% London Symphony (2017) Organising his shots into thematic blocks - nostalgic byways, religion, bins - Barrett has the knack of drawing out visual details that cause nice eddies in the film's melancholy flow.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Sep 1, 2017
3/5 98% Quest (2017) Quest makes it clear that some things endure beyond political events.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Aug 18, 2017
4/5 62% Dark Night (2017) Occasionally too emblematic as individuals, the characters collectively mesh into a portrait of a dislocated society elevated by Sutton's talent for disorienting imagery.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Aug 18, 2017
4/5 87% The Student ((M)uchenik) (2017) If The Student lacks the searing moral exactness of the Russian literature on which it draws, it's an often hypnotic warning against dogma's eternal allure.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
2/5 No Score Yet Chosen (2017) The framing device, whatever the commercial reasons, also has the unfortunate effect of sapping a degree of urgency from this ponderous and unfocused 1944-set tale.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
3/5 91% Transpecos (2016) Some of the intended moral heft goes astray in the heat and dust - but this is still a promising dry run for bigger things.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2017
3/5 81% Without Name (2016) Makes up for its occasional heavy tread with outstanding photography.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2017
4/5 92% Tanna (2016) An open-throated and universal call for change from within.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2017
2/5 No Score Yet Get Better: A Film About Frank Turner (2016) Unless you're already a fan, it's difficult to care.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 8, 2016
3/5 No Score Yet Half Way (2015) A crushingly personal dispatch from a family pushed off the edge of London's housing boom ...‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 2, 2016
2/5 No Score Yet The Search For Simon (2014) The gag rate might be high, but accumulatively, like its hero, it becomes infuriating.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2016