Meyer Levin (Patterson Murphy) Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Meyer Levin (Patterson Murphy)

Meyer Levin (Patterson Murphy)
Meyer Levin (Patterson Murphy)'s reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Esquire Magazine

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Fashions of 1934 (1934) The best of the smart-written pictures is Fashions of 1934, set in the Paris dress salons, with William Powell playing fast and tricky as an American slicker.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
71% Nana (1934) The picture is stodgy, pretentious, and utterly without the Zola verve. One can't quite decide about Anna. Maybe it was the wrong picture, or maybe she really can't act.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
90% Queen Christina (1933) The final eloseup of her face, suggesting a boat's figurehead, is austerely beautiful and the sum of all her art.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
80% Roman Scandals (1933) About ten percent of Roman Scandals is one hundred per cent entertainment. But the show on the whole is slow.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
100% Counsellor at Law (1933) Of the current epidemic of lawyer-pictures, "Counsellor-at-Law" is-the best. John Barrymore doesn't fit the part as did Paul Muni, but Elmer Rice's excellent storycraftsmanship carries the picture through.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet Lady Killer (1933) Lady Killer has some funny Hollywood movie-making scenes, and a swell cave-man shot...‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
82% Convention City (1933) Guy Kibbee, Adolph Menjou, Joan Blondell, and a mob of swell small-part actors keep the convention rolling on its belly, on its behind, on its ear. It's a perfect piece of native satire and a riot of entertainment.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
94% Captains Courageous (1937) At once the most virile and the tenderest of recent Hollywood photoplays; should rank high on any list of best pictures of all time.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
100% Elephant Boy (1937) ...as in all Flaherty films, the camera becomes so intimate as to reveal the very soul of the subject. If elephants have souls, they're in that film.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet Mountain Justice (1930) Josephine Hutchinson does the best work of her career as the heroine.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet Night Must Fall (1937) Surprise masterpiece performance by Robert Montgomery in a psychological chiller. Rosalind Russell also strong. Film similar but in every way superior to Love From A Stranger.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
67% The Prince and the Pauper (1937) The kids are surrounded with a terrific cast, including Claude Rains, Errol Flynn, Barton MacLane...‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet Internes Can't Take Money (You Can't Take Money) (1937) Cockeyed jumble of gangster and hospital picture ideas...‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet Love from a Stranger (1937) The climax is well-worth waiting for.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet The Woman I Love (1937) Splendidly mounted, splendidly cast, but doesn't quite come off.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet Good Old Soak (1937) Wallace Beery stumbling around, and everyone else walking through.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet Outcasts Of Poker Flats (1952) Not very hearty attempt at a classic.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
97% My Man Godfrey (1936) A frothy, frivolous farce...‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet Tudor Rose (Nine Days a Queen) (1936) A British production which is an excellent companion piece to Mary of Scotland. Between the two of them, you'll have a neat chunk of history. Nine Days a Queen is on the whole more satisfactory entertainment.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet Girls' Dormitory (1936) The film is negligible but for the introduction of Simone Simon, a young French actress who has the goods.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet His Brother's Wife (1936) Everyone in the picture is so awfully straight-backed...‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
78% The Devil-Doll (1936) ...all this is wasted in a drearily complicated yarn.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet The Road to Glory (1936) ...on the whole the film is a repetition of the usual baloney about courage and fortitude and patriotism.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
No Score Yet Give Me Your Heart (1936) Timed to the last eyelash by Roland Young, this is a classic bit of fun.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet Valiant Is the Word for Carrie (1936) Introducing, with complete success, that mighty fine actress, Gladys George.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet Ramona (1936) Another Technicolor hit. Watch for the scene where Loretta Young, locked in her room, turns her head toward the window...‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
86% Libeled Lady (1936) A four-ace cast in a scrambled-couple farce.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
93% Things to Come (1936) Go out of your way to see Things to Come, for the occasional flashes of modern design that recall Metropolis...‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet Dancing Pirate (1936) First dud for Technicolor. Romantic buffoonery with Charles Collins, a pretty Fred Astaire. Doesn't quite catch the gaily silly tone it attempts.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet The Ex-Mrs. Bradford (1936) Add this to the long chain of Thin Man successors. Now it's Jean Arthur's turn to be the nosey wife to William Powell's amateur detective...‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
83% Three Women (1924) Some of the best Soviet acting; if you saw Chapaev, Youth of Maxim, and a few others, you'll recognize it as an all-star production. ‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
83% Big Brown Eyes (1936) Cary Grant and Joan Bennett and Alan Baxter, who is being murderously typed. Here was one of the two best young actors to appear this year...but he happened to do a good job on a gangster.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet One Rainy Afternoon (1936) Mary Pickford tried God and produced a French farce. ‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet The Unguarded Hour (1936) Conventional upper-class who-done-it. Sat through the whole thing, fascinated, trying to figure out what has happened to Loretta Young. Looks the same, acts the same, but something is gone.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
93% Anna Karenina (1935) Fine, fine, and super-fine, if the least bit archaic.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
100% Top Hat (1935) Tops everything that Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers have done, and clicks as the gladdest, smoothest, truestto-medium movie musical ever made.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet The Dark Angel (1935) Sidney Franklin's direction makes this a rather fine film, filled with subtle touches.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet The Gay Deception (1935) Done with quite a bit of spontaneous feeling, presenting bubbling, happy Francis Lederer.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet She Married Her Boss (1935) The surprise performance is by Melvyn Douglas, who turns out to be quite a funny drunk.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet Special Agent (1935) Another type of G-man in the same type of picture. Bette Davis. Interesting because it presents the income tax prosecution angle in serious light.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet Here Comes the Band (1935) An interesting idea was mauled in this one. ‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet The Big Broadcast of 1936 (1935) One of those strung together epics in which every star and ham in radio, films, or the varieties gets pasted into the footage. A sickroom scene by Charles Ruggles is a pip, but they even have elephants dancing.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet Red Salute (1935) Based upon the lie that leaders of radical student organizations are "paid foreign agitators," this is as clever a piece of reactionary propaganda as has come out of Hollywood.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted May 4, 2020
No Score Yet I Am Suzanne! (1933) I Am Suzanne does not get the effects of changing expression, of liveliness, to be found in sculpturally modelled puppets....‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 30, 2020
No Score Yet Hi, Nellie! (1934) In sheer entertainment value, "Hi Nellie," the new Paul Muni picture, tops the month...‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 30, 2020
No Score Yet Gallant Lady (1933) The objectionable type of smart picture is best exemplified in Gallant Lady...the result, except for some very delightful sequences between Ann Harding and a child, is something one might expect of a high-school boy trying to write like Beverly Nichols...‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 30, 2020
No Score Yet This Is My Affair (1937) Routine bank-robber melodrama...‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 30, 2020
No Score Yet Pick a Star (1937) A fairly comic version of A Star Is Born, with Mischa Auer again proving that he ought to be in more pictures.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 30, 2020
No Score Yet The Go Getter (1937) Cappy Ricks story, idealizing servility under the guise of stickto-itiveness. ‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 30, 2020
No Score Yet Pride of the Marines (1945) Another enlistment poster, but fortunately lousy.‐ Esquire Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 23, 2020