Matthew Lucas Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/4 83% Just Mercy (2020) Buoyed by strong turns by Jordan and Foxx, Just Mercy treats stock characters like human beings, centers the victim's story, and refuses to ignore the collateral damage of wrongful convictions.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jan 10, 2020
3/4 90% 1917 (2020) Its technical aspects are so uniformly remarkable that one almost becomes so caught up in the nail-biting high-wire act on display that it's easy to miss the more human elements of the story it sought to illuminate in the first place.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jan 5, 2020
3/4 100% Don't Be a Dick About It (2020) A touching, often hilarious look at life with a sibling who drives you absolutely crazy, but you can't get enough of them anyway.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jan 4, 2020
3.5/4 84% Old Joy (2006) A buddy movie unlike any other, a kind of meditative reflection on masculinity, aging, and male friendship that feels at once familiar and bracingly new.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jan 4, 2020
3/4 No Score Yet Trapped (1949) Takes a lot of narrative chances by building the film around a cast of almost entirely unlikable and unscrupulous characters, and it pays off.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jan 4, 2020
3.5/4 83% The Story of Temple Drake (1933) Made with the full knowledge of how society at large felt about "girls like her," and those stereotypes of the "loose woman" are consistently interrogated and subverted.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jan 4, 2020
2.5/4 No Score Yet The Holly and the Ivy (1952) A great cast, including Celia Johnson and Denholm Elliot, add some heft, but the film ultimately feels like a missed opportunity.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jan 4, 2020
2.5/4 No Score Yet Glorifying the American Girl (1929) The static mise-en-scene is kind of fascinating, and the tableau scene is surprisingly erotic, featuring an array of barely dressed men and women reenacting historical paintings.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jan 4, 2020
3/4 95% Christmas in July (1940) A breeze to watch, and Sturges packs the brief running time with plenty of his trademark wit, skewering corporate vanity and overconfident male bluster in equal measure.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jan 4, 2020
1.5/4 16% The Grudge (2020) An unpleasant, humorless slog through the muck of low-budget January horror fodder that is neither frightening or particularly entertaining, blandly ambling from tired jump-scare to tired jump-scare.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Jan 3, 2020
3.5/4 90% Dark Waters (2019) [Haynes] takes the material and turns it into something both beautiful and horrific, a real-world revisit of the themes that made Safe one of his finest works.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 29, 2019
3.5/4 93% Long Day's Journey Into Night (Di qiu zui hou de ye wan) (2019) Its final, hour-long single take tracking shot is not only a marvel of technical ingenuity, it's like an out-of-body experience that shatters the boundaries of what cinema can do.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2019
0/4 21% Cats (2019) A borderline unwatchable mishmash of poorly conceived musical numbers and incoherent storytelling.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 24, 2019
3.5/4 99% Honeyland (2019) Stefanov and Kotevska deftly probe the delicate balance between humans and nature, and the somewhat tenuous connection that allows both to thrive.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 23, 2019
3.5/4 97% American Factory (2019) A complex examination of a globalized economy built on the backs of exploited laborers.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 23, 2019
3.5/4 99% Apollo 11 (2019) Miller (acting as his own editor) crafts the film like a verité narrative, offering breathtaking never-before-seen perspectives of the rocket launch and moon landing that play as a monument to human achievement.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 23, 2019
3.5/4 99% For Sama (2019) The terror and the human toll of the conflict feel tangible and immediate - as al-Kateab documents the world crumbling around her while her husband tries to open hospitals safe from Assad's bombs, their fear and anxiety become palpable. ‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 23, 2019
3/4 93% Monos (2019) There's an austere beauty at work here, the primordial allure of the nature that surrounds them belying the ugliness of the conflict hidden within the trees, and Mica Levi's sparsely haunting score is some of her finest work.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 23, 2019
2/4 53% Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (2019) A naked exercise in retrograde nostalgia that is perfectly content with playing the hits but fails to provide anything new or exciting.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2019
2/4 82% The Report (2019) It's a TV drama that provides a great service in telling this story for a wide audience, but it's as by-the-numbers as you can get.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2019
3/4 97% Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound (2019) Like film nerd catnip, a veritable who's who of cinematic sound artists discussing their craft and process and trading war stories of their time in the industry.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2019
2.5/4 92% The Lighthouse (2019) [Its] style-over-substance aesthetic seems to treat surrealism as just a simple horror technique rather than a psychological tool - and the result is eerie but feels somehow more shallow than The Witch.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2019
3.5/4 93% The Last Black Man in San Francisco (2019) A work of quiet, unassuming beauty. A probing, deeply personal exploration of his own family history and his love for the place he calls home.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2019
3/4 97% Knives Out (2019) [A] mischievous and wildly entertaining film.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2019
3/4 96% Hail Satan? (2019) A funny, kooky film that nevertheless offers a consistently engaging look at the sad irony of Christians ceding the moral high ground to Satanists.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2019
3/4 96% End of the Century (2019) Castro deftly begins to meld past and present into one narrative, unfolding like waves of memory slowly drifting back as faint recollections of a long forgotten dream.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2019
3/4 91% Burning Cane (2019) Perhaps it's his youth, but the way Youmans refuses to adhere to filmmaking convention displays a confidence that is often breathtaking.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2019
3/4 95% Little Women (2019) Gerwig's seemingly effortless direction combines modern sensibilities with a classical structure in ways that feels both fresh and timeless, teasing new life out of a familiar tale with warmth, wit, and grace.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2019
3.5/4 100% Chinese Portrait (2019) As the film progresses it becomes something at once wondrous and revelatory, a dynamic living document of modern China that invites viewers to take in the world around them.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 16, 2019
2/4 67% Bombshell (2019) Doubles down on many of the issues that plagued Trumbo, in many cases substituting "Saturday Night Live" style caricatures for real people in such a way that distances the audience from the human elements of the story. ‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2019
3.5/4 92% Uncut Gems (2019) The Safdies have designed Uncut Gems with knife's edge precision to tear audiences' nerves to shreds, and the results are as gripping as they are exhausting.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Dec 11, 2019
3.5/4 96% An Elephant Sitting Still (Da xiang xi di er zuo) (2019) It's as if the film was conjured from thin air, gorgeous, elemental, and tortured; Hu's consciousness made manifest and brought into being by sheer force of will. ‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 10, 2019
3/4 74% Richard Jewell (2019) Paul Walter Hauser is a revelation, turning in a truly extraordinary performance that lifts him up into a new realm.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Dec 9, 2019
3.5/4 95% Marriage Story (2019) A remarkable feat of raw-nerve acting, intuitive writing, sharp direction, and a deeply empathetic sense of humanity.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 7, 2019
3.5/4 82% Queen & Slim (2019) Channel(s) hundreds of years of systemic oppression into a blinding and beautiful work of art that feels like throwing a firecracker into a crowd.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2019
2/4 80% Jojo Rabbit (2019) The film certainly has good intentions, but it gets woefully lost somewhere on the road to hell.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 3, 2019
4/4 96% The Irishman (2019) In Scorsese's masterful hands it becomes an American tragedy writ-large, a sweeping portrait of great potential cut down by greed and corruption, and a road to hell paved by the best of intentions. ‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Dec 2, 2019
3/4 93% Klaus (2019) This unique take on the origins of Santa Claus examines the jolly old elf not as a literal person with magical powers, but as an idea of the spirit of giving, a fact that will likely go over many young heads but will hit adults square in the heart.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2019
2.5/4 64% The Good Liar (2019) Despite the film's somewhat cumbersome plotting, Mirren and McKellan are a constant pleasure to watch, and Carter Burwell's lilting score adds a sense of depth to the mystery.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2019
3.5/4 95% A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood (2019) This movie goes to some dark places, but it emerges hopeful. No other film this year has felt quite so cathartic, as if Mr. Rogers is somehow exorcising our accumulated pain from beyond the grave.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2019
3/4 77% Frozen II (2019) Tackles real world issues in a way that's both entertaining to children and palatable to adults. In short, Frozen II is Disney's best film of 2019.‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Nov 25, 2019
65% Lady and the Tramp (2019) Isn't attempting to retool its concept for an older audience that grew up with the original, resulting in a film less reliant on nostalgia.‐ In Review Online
Read More | Posted Nov 19, 2019
1.5/4 92% Ford v Ferrari (2019) Bloated, over-long, and celebrates the achievements of men only as they live to serve the capitalist machine, leaving anything resembling actual human drama in the dust. ‐ The Dispatch (Lexington, NC)
Read More | Posted Nov 18, 2019
3.5/4 100% The Docks of New York (1928) An eerie, wistful hymn to the forgotten men and women of the working class looking for their own slice of happiness in grungy places.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2019
3.5/4 100% The Last Command (1928) Jannings' performance is filled with both fire and humanity - he's a tyrant brought low, paying penance for a life of abusing those under him, and yet somehow we feel sorry for this man. ‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2019
4/4 87% Underworld (1927) Its luridly evocative look at honor among the gangsters and thieves who populate the Dreamland Cafe of Chicago is the stuff that old Hollywood dreams are made of.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2019
1.5/4 No Score Yet Bellboy and the Playgirls (1962) A rather bland film (especially considering it was basically supposed to be porn), and there's nothing you wouldn't see in a fairly tame R-rated film today.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2019
3/4 100% Gebo and The Shadow (Gebo et l'ombre) (2014) De Oliveira concocts striking images in very confined spaces, leaving us with a film that should feel cramped and claustrophobic but instead feels consistently vibrant and alive.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2019
4/4 100% Bless Their Little Hearts (2008) Woodberry is an unheralded virtuoso, and Bless Their Little Hearts is a revelation that can at long last be given its due.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2019
3.5/4 94% The Wild Pear Tree (Ahlat agaci) (2019) A nervy, jittery, restless work from a filmmaker determined to never stop probing, reflecting, and seeking answers.‐ From the Front Row
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2019