Leslie Felperin Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Leslie Felperin

Leslie Felperin
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/5 No Score Yet I, Pastafari: A Flying Spaghetti Monster Story (2020) An amiable enough diversion, competently assembled.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 21, 2020
2/5 44% Proximity (2020) It would all be much more of a campy hoot if it didn't go on for so long and bring Jesus into it towards the end.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 13, 2020
3/5 63% The Shed (2019) Most of the gore is neatly paired with sight gags to neutralise the terror, and it's an efficient enough machine for generating scares.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted May 6, 2020
77% Essential Killing (2010) Despite skillful assemblage, the script's plausibility issues increasingly undermine engagement, even with the generous argument that the pic is a parable and operates according to more poetic laws of realism. ‐ Variety
Read More | Posted May 5, 2020
2/5 50% Reborn (2018) It plays out on various levels of meta, like a movie that wants you to think it's secretly deep and resonant beneath all the pulpy trappings; but there isn't actually all that much really there.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Apr 29, 2020
100% The Dilemma of Desire (2020) Has many of the right moves.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2020
88% Misbehaviour (2020) All good stuff, as sensible as a cardigan.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2020
80% Rebuilding Paradise (2020) A sincere and skillfully assembled tribute to a community's fortitude.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Mar 5, 2020
3/5 70% Villain (2020) Sometimes a seemingly unprepossessing genre film comes along that has finer qualities than you would expect. Such is the case here.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
2/5 No Score Yet Tintoretto. A Rebel in Venice (Tintoretto. Un ribelle a Venezia) (2020) Although his argumentativeness, ambition and ruthless pursuit of commissions sort of supports the "rebel" thesis, just as much emphasis is laid on his deep immersion in the religious culture of the day.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2020
70% Forrest Gump (1994) It's too specific to be a proper allegory, and too vague to provide a satisfactorily millennial perspective on the last 50 years. Neither is it caustic enough to make one cry, nor soppy enough to make one laugh.‐ Sight and Sound
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
78% Wander Darkly (2020) Some may find this a path too well trodden by other movies, but what's refreshing is to see it through the eyes of a female protagonist for a change.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
100% His House (2020) Seamlessly meshing classic scary movie tropes with the more profound horror of real-world conflict zones, His House represents a harrowing but bracingly creative feature debut for British writer-director Remi Weekes.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Feb 4, 2020
No Score Yet Influence (2020) Even committed connoisseurs of corporate corruption may find it difficult to follow along with the film's narrative, especially since it digresses frequently to touch on related topics.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Feb 3, 2020
100% Dinner in America (2020) The engine idles while the two protagonists are maneuvered into place for their meet cute, but once that happens and the leads' chemistry supercharges the motor, it really lets rip.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Feb 3, 2020
80% Epicentro (2020) Sauper and his co-editor, veteran Yves Deschamps, work the material with a remarkable fluidity and gracefulness that's consistently engaging and surprising.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Feb 3, 2020
75% The Nowhere Inn (2020) The editing rolls the story along sufficiently so that as long as viewers aren't too bothered by the self-indulgent descents down narrative rabbit holes, it's a jolly enough way to spend 91 minutes.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2020
3/5 91% Show Me the Picture: The Story of Jim Marshall (2019) The illuminating discussion that springs from close friends, lovers and collaborators and even Marshall himself in some archive material, makes the trip worth it.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2020
45% Surge (2020) Even though Whishaw is mesmeric, by the end of the 105-minute running time the whole experience starts to feel like being trapped in a broken-down subway car with a violent mental patient.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2020
No Score Yet The Reason I Jump (2020) Instead of a literal adaptation, Rothwell's film is a supplement, an echo, a response that enriches the experience of the original work.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
No Score Yet Dream Horse (2020) Like horseracing, filmmaking is a high-risk gamblers' game, but the team behind Dream Horse, the resulting dramatization of the Vokes' story, have surely bred a winner with this endearing, determinedly crowd-pleasing adaptation.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
100% Sylvie's Love (2020) A love not quite supreme, but pretty good.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2020
86% The Social Dilemma (2020) An exemplary explainer, made with wit and clarity.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2020
83% The Nest (2020) An elegant, eerie drama of marital distress.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2020
73% Uncle Frank (2020) Although clearly made with earnest good intentions, this shabbily constructed work feels way too thirsty for audience love as it strings together a series of life-affirming, message-laden and sometimes embarrassingly anachronistic moments...‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2020
94% Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets (2020) Blurs the boundary between documentary and feature filmmaking, making for a playful, compelling sui generis work.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Jan 25, 2020
100% Herself (2020) At least there's Walter on hand to twinkle knowingly, delivering her lines in a crisp, pitch-perfect Irish accent, those stiletto sharp cheekbones cutting a dash through the treacle.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Jan 25, 2020
92% Miss Americana (2020) What's ultimately very endearing about Swift is her intelligence and self-awareness, qualities that also make her music compelling, sophisticated and capable of appealing both to adolescent kids and hipster musicologists.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Jan 24, 2020
3/5 No Score Yet Everything: The Real Thing Story (2019) In other hands this might have been a sharper, more acidic look at race in the British music industry, but the film's affability could draw in plenty of viewers.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2020
3/5 98% Fiddler: A Miracle of Miracles (2019) The clip of the Temptations singing a cover of If I Were a Rich Man is worth the price of admission alone.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2019
4/5 100% Buddies (1985) Offers a moving reminder of a time that seems both immensely far away and like yesterday.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 5, 2019
2/5 0% Invasion Planet Earth (2019) The performances, apart from those of the lead actors, are often painfully stiff, but presumably the cast had to do a lot of reacting to tennis balls on sticks in green-screen studios.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2019
2/5 No Score Yet Proceder (2019) It's a rocky eight-kilometre road, and the bizarre narrative sleight of hand that the script pulls two thirds in feels like a convoluted way to pony up the redemption hit that audiences crave...‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2019
3/5 91% The Biggest Little Farm (2019) Those interested in farming, adorable animals and environmentally friendly lifestyles will swoon over this lovingly made documentary...‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2019
2/5 No Score Yet Cattle Hill (KuToppen) (2019) The goofy-looking figures have been animated on the cheap, which means the fur textures look like plastic microfibre cloth and the faces barely move.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2019
2/5 67% Here For Life (2019) It is part documentary, part collectively created drama that keeps all its boundaries - between the fake and the real, biography/confession and fiction, and so on - porous and smudgy.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2019
3/5 97% The Gangster, the Cop, the Devil (2019) Like so many of the genre that hail from Seoul and its suburbs, this one punches well above its weight with an inventive reworking of well-worn plot tropes and slick production values.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2019
1/5 No Score Yet Devil in Red (2019) The sprinkling of casually amoral violence and mild misogyny are just the CBD gummies on the rancid cake of stupid that is this waste of hard drive memory.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2019
3/5 13% Arctic Dogs (2019) There are some wry, self-referential jokes and the animators are good at facial expressions and powdery, polar landscape textures.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 7, 2019
2/5 No Score Yet Rise of the Footsoldier: The Heist (2020) The whole thing is horribly nihilistic and cheerful all at once.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Nov 7, 2019
79% Get Santa (2014) [A]s they say in merry old England, a curate's egg, good in parts. Some parts - the solid cast, a few well-turned one-liners - are really quite good indeed, although viewers have to wade through a moderate fug of reindeer fart jokes to get to them.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Nov 5, 2019
3/5 59% Tales from the Lodge (2019) There's something primally satisfying about the episodic structure, a narrative pattern that after all goes back to Chaucer.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
4/5 100% Chained for Life (2019) This low-budget film written and directed by Aaron Schimberg is almost every kind of strange, and yet it has an amiable warmth and an inexhaustible reserve of originality that make it compelling as hell.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 24, 2019
2/5 No Score Yet Connect (2019) Working with sketchy characters who are little more than clusters of symptoms, the actors seem to be flailing to breathe life into the material.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2019
No Score Yet Eternal Beauty (2019) Creating a highly unusual and welcome look at schizophrenia that neither demonizes those with the condition nor patronizes them as suffering martyrs, British drama Eternal Beauty pulls off a tricky feat.‐ Hollywood Reporter
Read More | Posted Oct 21, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet Home (2019) The British adventurer Sarah Outen has made an introspective and emotionally brave film about her awe-inspiring journey around the world.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet Darkness Visible (2019) The dialogue is a bit stilted sometimes, and, once all the wrapping is off, the big reveal is slightly silly, but this rare instance of a western-style horror film set in India is an intriguing, largely inventive genre exercise.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2019
4/5 98% Corpus Christi (Boze cialo) (2020) Often moving but also disquieting and even intermittently funny, this drama unfurls a spiritual parable that is uniquely Polish but accessible to all.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2019
3/5 100% Suzi Q (2019) A fan-servicing but not necessarily hagiographic documentary...‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
3/5 No Score Yet The Creatress (2019) It's all a bit baffling, a little too post-postmodern for its own good.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Oct 10, 2019