Judith Crist Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Judith Crist

Judith Crist
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
87% Bonnie and Clyde (1967) Naturalism -- in characters and background -- is the mark of this film in its technical perfections. Saturated in time and place, we are left with the universality of the theme and its particular contemporary relevance.‐ Vogue
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
60% Our Mother's House (1967) Dirk Bogarde creates an unforgettable character as the vulgar, sinister, and somehow appealing "father" who invades the children's world.‐ Vogue
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
No Score Yet The Penthouse (1967) [The Penthouse] made a splash at the Berlin Film Festival (if muck can make a spash).‐ Vogue
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
57% Games (1967) Pretentiously posh and pointless nonsense.‐ Vogue
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
No Score Yet The Tiger Makes Out (1967) The result is an attractive and bemusing piece of costume jewelry -- but not comparable to the real thing.‐ Vogue
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
67% Far From the Madding Crowd (1967) I expected a movie to make me stand up and cheer or at least sit up and take notice. Instead it's curl-up and doze-fitfully time.‐ Vogue
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
100% Smashing Time (1967) It's on beat and offbeat, a Mod film that makes the most of the Mack Sennett tradition, a satire on swinging London that swings to its own London rhythm.‐ Vogue
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
No Score Yet The Thief of Paris (Le Voleur) (1967) With The Thief of Paris Louis Malle once again proves himself not only one of the more thoughtful of the New Wave filmmakers but also one of the more versitile.‐ Vogue
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
90% Something Wild (1986) The end's not unexpected, and the soundtrack's overloaded with songs, but once Something Wild gets really wild -- with Daniels and Griffith and Demme's fringe comedy at their best -- the movie makes its mark as offbeat entertainment.‐ WWOR-TV (NJ)
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2020
No Score Yet The Lost Man (1969) The emphasis is on the suspense story -- and we will, I suppose, have to settle for being grateful that it is wrapped in contemporary terms.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
No Score Yet The Chairman (1969) Idiotic.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
83% My Side of the Mountain (1969) That rare "family" film that deals with flesh-and-blood rather than fairy-tale or television soap opera people, that talks about today in timeless terms, that finds its comedy and its high adventure and its moments of truth in human experience.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
No Score Yet Hello Down There (1969) The dolphins get all the lines. A pity they didn't write them.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
92% The Wild Bunch (1969) If you must see The Wild Bunch, be sure to take along a barf bag.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
No Score Yet The Boys of Paul Street (1969) Just plain tedious.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
No Score Yet The Maltese Bippy (1969) The film gets off to an absolutely hilarious start, a grand takeoff on movie credits and moviemaking. Then, alas, it settles down to a spotty sort of The Cat and the Canary comedy -- before coming up with one of the funniest finales on record.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
94% Murmur of the Heart (1971) The performances are remarkable, with Lea Massari (remember the girl who disappeared in L'Avventura?) as the mother; Bdnoit Ferreux as the boy, and Daniel Gelin as the inhibited and inhibiting father, sheer perfection.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
92% Punishment Park (1971) The most offensive of the recent Festival films I have seen to date.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
No Score Yet Bunny O'Hare (1971) There are moments when you don't hear the clank and grind. But only moments.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
83% The Other (1972) If you have not read Tom Tryon's The Other, don't before you see the film made from this best-seller of a year ago. And if you have read it, prepare to find yourself quite uninvolved in the course of the movie.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
29% Hammersmith Is Out (1972) Hammersmith Is Out is another of those heavy-handed "the criminally insane are running the world" parables that almost comes off -- but not quite, in spite of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton giving their best performances of recent years‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
No Score Yet The Trial of the Catonsville Nine (1972) Its true success is that it works on many levels -- as courtroom drama, as a contemporary document, as a statement of conscience and, perhaps most important, as a challenge to your own courage when you witness that of the Catonsville Nine. ‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
No Score Yet Malcolm X (1972) It stands as a vital record of a man of our time, that rare man who grew and changed and tempered his views to his intellectual maturity alone -- and never to the times.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019
No Score Yet Jovita (1970) [Jovita] is beautifully made and offers an intriguing mixture of realism and romanticism in its themes.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 14, 2019
44% McQ (1974) There are killings aplenty fore and aft, car chases galore, lots of non-actors to match Wayne; lots of actors to be wasted... lots of flashy photography of Seattle to glaze the eye, and marble-mouthed dialogue to stultify the brain.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
No Score Yet Road Movie (1974) One cannot fault the actors, all of whom have shown themselves capable players in other situations.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
No Score Yet Superdad (1973) It is shoddy and stupid by the lowest family-fare standards.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
No Score Yet Gishiki (The Ceremony) (1971) Strictly for cineastes who can justify all sorts of incoherencies and inanities in the name of cult.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
48% Zardoz (1974) [Zardoz] demonstrates how one can make a cheap sci-fi flick look like a cheap sci-fi flick by using mirrors and prisms as substitutes for imagination.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
91% Partner (1968) Clementi is delightful both as the ineffective young man and his alter ego who gets things done, achieving a mad mixture of the debonair and the Byronic, hopeless intellectualizer and sardonic observer.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
86% Thieves Like Us (1974) It is, is, perhaps, the most demanding of his recent films -- but as always, the demands are justified and rewarding.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
91% The Last Detail (1973) Add immaculate casting, a noteworthy debut for cinematographer Michael Chapman, and a spare and subtle score by Johnny Mandel, and you're left with a gem of a film.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
No Score Yet Henry VIII and His Six Wives (1972) With yeoman direction by Waris Hussein, the film is, in sum, a thinking-man's spectacular, with something, of course, to please even the non-thinkers.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
50% Happy New Year (1973) As a triple-threat moviemaker -- producer, director, and writer -- Lelouch has provided a triple-leveled film that works as thriller, as romance, and as humanistic story, and emanates chic every step of the way.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
100% Sleeper (1973) [Allen] has provided us with our comedy of the year and enabled us to call it hilarious without a quibble or a hesitation -- just with bellylaughs and guffaws.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
60% Little Murders (1971) This film, with brilliant screenplay by Feiffer and matching direction by Alan Arkin and a cast that almost outshines them both, is the quintessential comment on our human and/or family relationships, our way of coping with the horrors around us.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
No Score Yet Ramparts of Clay (Remparts d'argile) (1971) This is the rare film that brings the exotic to us in everyday terms that bring empathy.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
40% Julius Caesar (1970) [Director Stuart Burge] has taken a pragmatic view even of the poetry; his is a virile drama of men making the most of their moments and making the world move with them.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
No Score Yet Puzzle of a Downfall Child (1970) The film is as static, boringly camp-elegante and fatuous as a stack of flop issues of Vogue.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
No Score Yet Doctors' Wives (1971) Doctors' Wives is so trashily awful a movie that it would be worth the wallow for those who love the sight of blood.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
No Score Yet Say Hello to Yesterday (1971) Neither morals nor messages nor an iota of credibility can be found in this frenetic, pretentious pap.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
No Score Yet One More Time (1971) An exercise in tasteless tedium that doesn't merit the bottom of a triple bill at a drive-in.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
100% The Passion of Anna (En Passion) (1970) The Passion of Anna is a complex and beautiful work, one which bears the pondering and probing that so few films merit. It is an encounter, above all, with a sophisticated and subtle mind concerned with mature human relationships.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
96% Rosemary's Baby (1968) The fault ultimately is in the Polanski screenplay which overlooks character for effect, disastrously. Involvement is absent; all is surface and it is a smooth one, without the shimmer of the evil that is within.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
91% Fists in His Pocket (I pugni in tasca) (1968) Madness and murder, inversion and perversion are carried to almost ludicrous proportions but Bellocchio never loses control of a manner or a mood and there are a number of superb performers on hand to enforce the validity of the film.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
No Score Yet L'Immortelle (1969) The blend of style and theme result in an exciting and haunting film.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
86% Petulia (1968) All is location, all is mod mood and the disappointment is bitter.‐ New York Magazine/Vulture
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2019
91% Gone With the Wind (1939) Undoubtedly still the best and most durable piece of popular entertainment to have come off the Hollywood assembly lines.‐ The Atlantic
Read More | Posted Jan 1, 2000