Joshua Brunsting Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Joshua Brunsting

Joshua Brunsting
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
84% The Europeans (2019) The first of three Henry James adaptations produced by the Merchant Ivory team, this is an entrancing entry not just in their partnership but in the career of Ivory himself.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2020
96% The Cave (2019) A thrilling, ceaselessly captivating documentary...‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Dec 3, 2019
86% Synonyms (Synonymes) (2019) A captivating look at the intersection between nationalism and toxic masculinity, few films feel as vital and truly important in 2019 as this superlative piece of work. ‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2019
100% Gay Chorus Deep South (2019) Gorgeously shot, Gay Chorus Deep South is a handsomely rendered, if maybe a bit thin, look at a group of people trying to bring about change through music.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2019
No Score Yet A Fish in the Bathtub (1999) Joan Micklin Silver's underrated and rarely seen comedic gem is a gorgeously shot, emotionally rich romantic comedy with a collection of ace performances and an ace script‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2019
97% Recorder: The Marion Stokes Project (2019) What makes Recorder so utterly compelling and beautifully textured is the absolute compassion and sympathy that director Matt Wolf has for his subject‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2019
86% Feast of the Epiphany (2018) The premiere film from Reverse Shot, this docu-fiction hybrid is a quiet, moving portrait of life, loss and food.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Dec 1, 2019
96% First Love (Hatsukoi) (2019) Miike's direction is visceral, finding the filmmaker not only completely invested in this narrative but also willing to break from his formula at a drop of the hat. ‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2019
99% Parasite (Gisaengchung) (2019) Bong takes this battle between classes and one family's attempt to take that much craved next step up the economic ladder, and twists it into a fun house thrill ride.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2019
88% Je t'aime moi non plus (I Love You, I Don't) (1976) Gainsbourg may not have the skill to nail a finale that's almost too violent, but thanks to a new restoration, Je T'aime Moi Non Plus is an absolute revelation.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2019
61% Dilili in Paris (Dilili à Paris) (2019) Feminist and anti-racist to the bone, Ocelot's latest film is a startling, if misshapen, gem that will hopefully find an audience despite a modest release schedule.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2019
79% Loro (2019) Servillo's Berlusconi is nuanced in a way that nothing else in the film is. Lacking the satirical bite of a Wolf Of Wall Street, Loro is a lushly composed, toothless satire.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2019
44% The Wedding Year (2019) It's rare, in 2019, to have a genuinely good time at the movies and this, in all of its simplicity and cliche, is absolutely that.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2019
88% Diego Maradona (2019) With a scholarly eye towards research, Maradona is a richly textured, nuanced portrait not only of a titanic figure in sports, but the rise of a sportsman into a god.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2019
93% Monos (2019) A visceral rumination on devolving social norms in the face of war, Monos is not only the return of a great filmmaker, but one of the great political allegories of 2019.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2019
67% I'm Leaving Now (Ya me voy) (2019) Viewers may not learn a lot about this man or his life specifically, but through a profound sense of intimacy they may find something even greater under this film's proverbial hood - empathy.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
88% Moonlight Sonata: Deafness in Three Movements (2019) Moonlight Sonata becomes a tender and evocative document of a very specific human experience that's palpable for anyone forced to deal with a set back in life.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2019
97% American Factory (2019) Documenting this in as frank a manner as Riechert and Bognar do is incredibly wise, avoiding the easy, disposable type of agitprop that has made a home on streaming in 2019.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
85% Friedkin Uncut (2019) At best, Friedkin Uncut is a serviceable EPK on whatever Friedkin film is set to get yet another Blu-ray release. Flat, lifeless, superficial. Just a slog. ‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
96% End of the Century (2019) Closing on a note that's almost meta-physical in its sense of wish-fulfillment, End Of The Century is a profoundly moving, intensely quiet romance drama‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
87% What You Gonna Do When the World's on Fire? (2019) Never once does his camera feel manipulative or judgemental, instead turning what could be your typical message documentary into one whose existence feels utterly essential‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
93% The Flower (La flor) (2019) captivating rumination on the artist-muse relationship, creativity writ large and the breaking down of narrative, La Flor is one of the very best films of 2019 ‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
60% Them That Follow (2019) A film about fundamental faith and its poisonous nature, Them That Follow is a much-needed change of pace from this loud summer movie season.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
82% Homewrecker (2019) With a pair of great lead performances at its center, Homewrecker is among the best, most odd thrillers at this year's Fantasia International Film Festival.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2019
A- 83% The Original Kings of Comedy (2000) Ostensibly a shot performance of a comedians Steve Harvey, D.L. Hughley, Bernie Mac and Cedric The Entertainer, the film is not only genuinely funny, but also very much a cultural touchstone.‐ Movie Mezzanine
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
93% Sword of Trust (2019) Arguably a bit thin, this is otherwise a charming, beautifully made comedy with a career-defining performance from co-star Marc Maron. ‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
84% The Art of Self-Defense (2019) Everything Stearns' script says about masculinity and gender dynamics is superficial and rudimentary, with few actual biting laughs amidst a film that's limp emotionally.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
80% A Faithful Man (L'homme fidèle) (2019) A typically French three hander, this romantic comedy/drama takes three ace performances and turns them into a knotty web of romantic farce that, at 75 minutes, is captivating‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
No Score Yet Birthday Wonderland (2019) Legendary filmmaker Keiichi Hara returns with a gorgeous, if aggressively uneven, fairy-tale that's rich with style but a bit thin on thematic texture. ‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
86% We Are Little Zombies (2019) This debut feature film is an inspired and beautifully rendered rumination on grief through the eyes of four orphan children.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
88% The Great Hack (2019) Now available on Netflix, this new documentary looks at the state of data as a commodity in the modern age, yet does so in an incredibly simple, seemingly disposable manner‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
96% The Gangster, the Cop, the Devil (2019) With an incomparable, classically brutish lead performance, Lee Won-Tae's latest effort is a simply told, thrilling action film, a rarity in 2019 cinema. ‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
64% The Mountain (2019) Rick Alverson returns with a jaundiced look at 50s Americana which, with a collection of show-stealing performances, is one of the year's best films.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
100% House of Hummingbird (Beolsae) (2018) Bora Kim's debut film is one of the most exciting discoveries of this year's Fantasia International Film Festival, a tender and moving coming of age drama above reproach‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jul 28, 2019
93% Wild Rose (2019) There's a looseness to the film that's rare for this genre, turning what could be a slight rise-to-stardom film into something that pops off the screen and demands attention.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
96% The Edge of Democracy (2019) Costa's personal, unforgettable rumination on modern Brazilian politics is now on Netflix and is one of the great political documentaries of 2019.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
96% Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (2019) Director Greenfield-Sanders crafts a documentary that's almost claustrophobic in its structure and form, a film that's reverence for its subject fosters pure hagiography.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
87% Ever After (Endzeit) (2019) Between the performances and a director who embeds the film with an entrancing blending of genre and atmosphere, Ever After is a gorgeously made, impeccably acted, drama‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
75% Halston (2019) Much too long, Tcheng's latest documentary is thin on content despite having a fascinating structure. Fine, but forgettable and frustratingly disposable. Fast fashion as film.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jun 10, 2019
89% The Raft (2019) The Raft is a strange, oddly engrossing piece of non-fiction filmmaking, a film that has the atmosphere of a true crime thriller and the style of a von Trier film. A doozy.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jun 10, 2019
78% Leto (2019) Leto is a gorgeous, endlessly charming romance drama that's part jukebox musical and part anthropological document. With revolution on the periphery, Leto is a superb picture.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jun 10, 2019
33% Domino (2019) Iconic filmmaker Brian De Palma is a fascinating, often frustrating master who has made a fascinating, often frustrating thriller.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jun 10, 2019
98% Too Late to Die Young (Tarde para morir joven) (2019) It's a film that plays like a dream remembered, floating in and out of lives and conversations, having both a warmth and, come the final act, a shattering sense of reality that leaves the viewer utterly shellshocked.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted Jun 10, 2019
85% Woodstock: Three Days That Defined a Generation (2019) Despite being yet another documentary about Woodstock, this becomes an essential document of the festival through its access to never-before-seen footage. ‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
100% Barbara Rubin & the Exploding NY Underground (2019) It may be much too short, but pound for pound, minute for minute, there are few biographical documentaries more impressive than this.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
97% The Proposal (2019) A captivating rumination on ownership and democracy within the art world, The Proposal is as entrancing a documentary as there has been yet in 2019.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
90% Walking on Water (2019) Walking On Water is an evocative meditation on one man's creative process and one that's as captivating to watch as it is provocative to think about.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
100% The Wandering Soap Opera (La Telenovela Errante) (2019) Finished by Sarmiento after Ruiz's passing, The Wandering Soap Opera is a thrilling work, an experiment in genre that evolves into something intensely surreal and political. ‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
79% Pasolini (2019) The first of four films released theatrically this year from director Abel Ferrara, Pasolini is a deeply moving look at a legendary film revolutionary.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
96% Grass (2019) Hong Sang-soo returns with his 22nd film, a masterpiece that turns a simple, almost theater-like premise into an ambulatory rumination on life and death.‐ The CriterionCast
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019