Danny Leigh Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Danny Leigh

Danny Leigh
Danny Leigh's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Guardian, Sight and Sound, Financial Times

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
5/5 97% 45 Years (2015) Haigh has a miniaturist's gift for nuance, pressing a hundredweight of personal history into fleeting exchanges. Rampling and Courtenay are just as immaculate.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Aug 27, 2015
5/5 97% Mustang (2015) I won't tell you how it ends. I will say you should see for yourself.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2016
5/5 88% The Lobster (2016) Part of the joy of Lanthimos's film is seeing in it any degree of subtext you like.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2016
5/5 83% Mulholland Drive (2001) Mulholland Drive is pure cinema - a gorgeous, noir-narcotic loop of heartbreak in the "dream place" of Los Angeles.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2017
5/5 96% The Death of Stalin (2018) An audacious comedy of horrors, the film has the feel of a bad dream you find yourself not wanting to wake up from.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2017
5/5 99% North by Northwest (1959) As the template for a certain kind of old-school confection - Cold War, Wrong Man - it's unbeatable.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2017
5/5 80% 22 July (2018) 22 July is a brave and careful film.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Sep 5, 2018
5/5 97% The Hate U Give (2018) The Hate U Give is about right now, and feels a perfect fit for it.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Oct 24, 2018
5/5 99% Shoplifters (Manbiki kazoku) (2018) If Shoplifters asks huge questions about what a family is and is not, the answers are hinted at in fleeting gestures - the hallmark of this beautiful, ambiguous film.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2018
5/5 99% Eighth Grade (2018) Eighth Grade is also deeply sweet in unexpected places and howlingly funny, attuned to the timeless indignities of any adolescence.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 24, 2019
5/5 99% Ash Is Purest White (2019) The story is so richly novelistic the temptation is just to synopsise - but that risks not only spoilers, but failing to convey how much wonder is conjured beyond the plot, the stellar performance of Zhao, the insta-futuristic landscapes...‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 25, 2019
5/5 92% Uncut Gems (2019) There is more to the Safdies' secret sauce than panic. At first glance the cast has the feel of a group of strangers grabbed at random from the sidewalk, yet it clicks and keeps clicking.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2020
5/5 99% Parasite (Gisaengchung) (2019) A film that always has two thoughts in its head at once, a spectacular epic and tightly wound chamber piece, chicly sophisticated, brutal as a hammer.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Feb 5, 2020
4/5 76% Welcome To New York (2015) The surface might seem chaotic, but beneath is structural precision. Shot with a maestro's skillset, Welcome to New York is worth it for the light show alone, Manhattan awash in morning gold, infernal red, inky small-hours blue.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2014
4/5 96% To Catch a Thief (1955) The whole thing is really a condensed summer holiday, all hot sun and suavity.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2014
4/5 66% The Rover (2014) Brutal as it is, The Rover evolves into a strange kind of buddy movie. Squint and you might be watching a nihilistic Rain Man.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2014
4/5 86% The Wolfpack (2015) A remarkable New York story, one made with a pinch of tabloid exposé and another of sociological experiment.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Aug 20, 2015
4/5 86% Steve Jobs (2015) [Boyle's] real achievement is making cinema out of material that isn't even a stage play as much as very expensive radio: a battery of dialogue, unbroken by reflective pauses or even, on occasion, the actors drawing breath.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Nov 12, 2015
4/5 70% The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 (2015) For a CGI-stuffed blockbuster franchise aimed at 14-year-olds, this was always a smart one, its real life echoes at once grimly specific and usefully vague.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Nov 19, 2015
4/5 88% Straight Outta Compton (2015) The movie has inescapable verve, capturing why its subjects mean every bit as much as The Sex Pistols or Rolling Stones.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Jan 1, 2016
4/5 97% Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures (2016) Appreciative of its subject's gifts, frank about his flaws. You can also use it as a guide to the 1980s art world and the journey of Manhattan from scuzzy bohemia to real estate gold mine.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 21, 2016
4/5 96% Son of Saul (2015) I can only say the film is, by its own measure, a triumph. Engineered with virtuoso skill, every moment screams You Are Here. And here is hell.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 28, 2016
4/5 88% Florence Foster Jenkins (2016) It takes skill to keep us laughing in a film with only one gag, but Frears' deadpan is the ideal accompaniment. He also keeps the joke from turning cruel.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted May 5, 2016
4/5 84% The President (2016) Tonally, The President tacks from black comedy into raw outrage, treacherous ground trod so deftly you feel like applauding. This is a gripping and lucid film.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted May 31, 2016
4/5 97% Hell or High Water (2016) For Mackenzie, a British filmmaker whose career to date has been nomadic, the movie feels like finally finding the right key for a lock.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Sep 8, 2016
4/5 83% Deepwater Horizon (2016) The script gleams with efficiency. For all the winsomeness of the Williams family, yanked heartstrings are rare, the plain fact of 126 people on a fireball-in-waiting allowed to exert its own power.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Sep 29, 2016
4/5 74% Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016) For all the pressure bearing down on it - how badly the creaking movie industry could do with five sure-fire box office smashes - it feels, remarkably, like a tale told for the fun of it.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Nov 17, 2016
4/5 73% Miles Ahead (2016) Cheadle -- directing his first feature -- creates a film whose nerve its hero would surely admire.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2016
4/5 88% Born To Be Blue (2016) Ejogo makes vivid work of that dread device, the composite character. Hawke, film-star handsome but unable to match the ruined angel looks of his alter-ego, still manages to summon up his lost-boy charisma.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2016
4/5 93% Queen of Katwe (2016) For every cliché the film indulges, another is skirted, and another subverted. By the end, every ounce of feelgood is deserved.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2016
4/5 98% Your Name. (Kimi No Na Wa.) (2017) What starts with a brightly coloured pop leaves behind a powder trail of loveliness.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2016
4/5 82% Captain Fantastic (2016) There are many tonal plates being spun here; the lack of a deafening crash is impressive. It comes down, you suspect, to the film's embrace of its own contradictions.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Dec 28, 2016
4/5 95% The Handmaiden (Ah-ga-ssi) (2016) Plots twist and twist again, but the true surprise is the film's grasp of power between classes, and sexes, colonial and colonised. Nestled here too is a charge of real emotion.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2017
4/5 93% Clash (Eshtebak) (2017) A work of fiendish formal brilliance.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2017
4/5 85% The Transfiguration (2017) O'Shea lets his story burn slowly - the better, it turns out, to lodge in the mind.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2017
4/5 83% A Moving Image (2017) Fittingly, the film is itself a grand collage, drama spliced with documentary, music and dance.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017
4/5 88% Lady Macbeth (2017) A deeply modern thriller borne from the 19th century, one whose traces of Hitchcock, Hardy and Haneke never obscure its huge originality.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2017
4/5 97% Burden (2017) An oddly charming documentary about his interwoven, sometimes violent, life and art.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
4/5 95% Citizen Jane: Battle for the City (2017) Movies thrive on the clash of titans, and in Matt Tyrnauer's new documentary Citizen Jane: Battle for the City we have a peach.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
4/5 92% Mindhorn (2016) The story, of course, is mostly pretext, but the movie brims with unexpected pleasures.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
4/5 83% The Villainess (Ak-Nyeo) (2017) A film of swaggering precision.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
4/5 97% I Am Not a Witch (2018) First-time feature director Rungano Nyoni has a comic gift, coolly ticking away at the heart of her singular satire I Am Not a Witch.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2017
4/5 97% Mudbound (2017) The shape of modern America is glimpsed behind the drama in this graceful, devastating film.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2017
4/5 96% Western (2018) While the film hums with potential conflict, Grisebach is too singular simply to dress an old genre in new clothes. Instead, she coolly holds back her camera and paces out the escalation of hostilities under a humid Balkan sun.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 11, 2018
4/5 95% Custody (Jusqu'à la garde) (2018) Judge not - yet here we are in the scalding French drama Custody, observing the legal endgame of a painful divorce from the perspective of the bench.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 11, 2018
4/5 100% Even When I Fall (2017) It knows the spectacular comes in many forms.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 11, 2018
4/5 86% Let the Sunshine In (Un beau soleil intérieur) (2018) The structure is so deceptively simple we hardly notice the accretion of character detail, until eventually Binoche vanishes and there is only Isabelle, a neat trick before a sly wink of an ending.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2018
4/5 77% Funny Cow (2017) f the gift of Funny Cow herself is her refusal to conform, the same goes for her story. And it's Peake who brings the thing alive.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2018
4/5 85% Avengers: Infinity War (2018) For critics who have spent much of the 21st century sniffing at the rise of the Marvel Comics Universe, it is probably time to admit that when the films are this good, they deserve every last beaming member of their audience.‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 25, 2018
4/5 91% Beast (2018) Pearce plays an impish game with our preconceptions, pulling us this way and that...‐ Financial Times
Read More | Posted Apr 25, 2018